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Chocolates around the Globe

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Chocolate is the world’s best loved confectionery. But not everyone has the same tastes, and chocolate varies widely in taste and consistency from one region and country to another.

Mexican Chocolate

Mexican Chocolate

Mexico is chocolate’s birth place. As early as 400 AD, it was used by Mayan royalty in a hot drink known as “chocolatl”. The drink was made from liquefied beans of the coca plant and spiced with a hint of chilli pepper. Chocolate is still a valuable commodity for Mexico, and hot chocolate is the country’s national drink. It’s also still popular to enjoy it with a hint of chilli.

Swiss Chocolate

Swiss Chocolate

Switzerland is the world’s top chocolate consumer, clocking in at just over 22% of the world’s total chocolate consumption. Approximately one bar of chocolate is consumed per Swiss citizen every day of the year. Swiss chocolate is recognized for its high quality, and especially for the high quality of the cocoa butter it contains. Of the chocolate consumed in Switzerland, light milk chocolate is the most popular, totaling around 75%. Dark chocolate comes in second at 20%, and white chocolate is third at 5%.

US Chocolate

Snickers

The United States included chocolate as part of emergency rations for soldiers in both World Wars. It has even been part of the official diet of US astronauts. This historical “rationing” of chocolate may have helped fuel its popularity. Today Americans manufacture and consume a huge array of different types of chocolate bars and small candies. The most ubiquitous brand of chocolate is Hershey’s, and the most eaten chocolate bar is the Snickers. Milk chocolate is favored by 71% of Americans.

Belgian Chocolate

Belgian Chocolate

Belgian chocolate is considered to be the best in the world, especially in the case of dark chocolate. This may be partly because chocolate making standards are actually enforced by Belgian law! The country’s association with chocolate stretches back as far as 1635, when Belgium was still under Spanish occupation. At that time, it imported cocoa from the Belgian Congo, which is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Belgium has over 2,000 independent chocolate shops, offering handmade chocolates and pralines in an amazing variety of shapes and flavors.

French Chocolate

French Truffles

The French mode du chocolat is the truffle, a small spherical chocolate often filled with a ganache and rolled – or “enrobed” –in nuts, icing, cocoa powder or whatever the chocolatier fancies! Although many variations of the truffle exist today, the traditional French truffle is milk chocolate filled with fresh chocolate-cream, rolled in cocoa powder or nuts.

Ecuadorian Chocolate

Ecuadorian Chocolate

Ecuador is considered the home of the world’s best cacao beans, thanks to a climate and soil conditions that are ideal for growing cacao. Ecuador exports its cacao to many of the world’s top chocolatiers. It also produces fine chocolates of its own. The very best it the 100% organic dark chocolate, unlike any other dark chocolate you’d have tasted thanks to its purity.

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This post was provided by a Jeff, a self-confessed chocaholic who wrote this piece on behalf of Chocolate Time, a South African chocolate.

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